Sneak Peek: Excerpt #5 from Tales of Enchantment

This article is part of the blog tour for Tales of Enchantment by Kai Andersen. For more information on the tour, such as giveaways and tour schedule, click here.
For more articles related to the book, visit the main book page by clicking here.

Here is an excerpt from the book Tales of Enchantment by Kai Andersen.

Book Overview
Love fairy tale retellings? Indulge your craving in this never before compiled selection!

Love fairy tale retellings? Indulge your craving in this never before compiled selection!

Red and the Huntsman

Red has turned eighteen, yet her mother (and everyone else) persists in seeing her as a little girl. She doesn’t know if it is because of her petite stature...

Excerpt from The Question of Royalty (Tales of Enchantment Book 2):

“Has –” Serena cleared her throat and tried again. “Has it happened before?” At Frederick’s blank look, she explained, “Peasant girls claiming to be princesses and all that.”

He snorted. “It happens all the time. But it became especially serious these last two years when I was out wife-hunting, to the point that I was ready to give up and forget all about it. But I couldn’t.” He was silent for a moment. “I’m the Crown Prince of Mithirien, and I have a duty to my family, to my lineage, and to my kingdom.”

The vise clamped tighter around Serena’s heart. This was what the queen was talking about last night — this duty. At the same time, her heart squeezed at the strained look on his face and in his eyes. How she wished she could take away all his burdens. No wonder he was always so serious. Even in his enjoyment of her body, he was so intense. The heavy weight of responsibility must have pressed down on him.

“So you’re looking for a princess to wife –”

“Not just any princess.” He strode swiftly to stand before her. “But a real princess.”

“Why?” Was that why he was marrying Giselda? Did she count as a real princess?

“I promised my mother. She was dying.”

“I’m sorry.” She offered her condolences in a quiet voice.

“It was a long time ago, about eight years. I guess I’m lucky, because I got to know her before … before …”

“You miss her.”

“She was a wonderful mother.”

“I’m sure she must have been.”

“I killed her.”

Note: This article is also featured on the following site: The Romance Reviews